atavistpress
Published September 17, 2012
<p style="text-align:left">Atavist No. 17, <em>Stowaway</em>, by Josh Neufeld and Tori Marlan, traces the 12,000 mile journey of an orphan from Ethiopia to America. This immersive storytelling platform includes a soundtrack, animations, panel-by-panel navigation and behind-the-scenes glimpses into the making of a non-fiction graphic novel.</p>
Published November 28, 2012
<div><p>On an afternoon in February 2011, two U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents were driving on a highway in central Mexico when they were ambushed by drug cartel gunmen. In the firefight that followed, one of the agents, Jaime Zapata, was killed&mdash;the first U.S. law enforcement agent to die in the line of duty in Mexico in more than a quarter of a century.</p></div><p>Mexican authorities quickly apprehended members of the Zetas, Mexico&rsquo;s most notorious criminal organization, who confessed to the murder. It looked like an open-and-shut case&mdash;until it was discovered that the guns used to kill Zapata had come from the United States, purchased by American gun buyers who investigators had been watching for months but hadn&rsquo;t arrested. For the federal law enforcement agencies still reeling from the Fast &amp; Furious scandal, it seemed like a horrible kind of d&eacute;j&agrave; vu.</p><p>Could Zapata&rsquo;s death have been prevented? Journalist Mary Cuddehe set out to find the answer. The extraordinary story of&nbsp;<em>Agent Zapata</em>&nbsp;traces the chain of events that led to the murder and explores its consequences, a journey that takes us from the&nbsp;seedy pawnshops of East Texas to the cartel-besieged cities of northern Mexico to the corridors of power in Washington, D.C.</p>
Published October 24, 2012
Published January 26, 2011
<p>The robbers had a helicopter, explosives, and inside information on a $150 million cash repository. But the police were on to them. Inside of one of history&#39;s most elaborate heists, and the race to unravel it.&nbsp;</p><p>This is the full enhanced edition of <em>Lifted,&nbsp;</em>with surveillance video, a complete audio version read by the author, photographs, character profiles, timelines, interactive maps, primary evidence documents, and more.</p><p><em>The Atavist&nbsp;</em>No. 2, January / February 2011</p><p>Praise for <em>Lifted</em>:</p><p>&ldquo;A&nbsp;can&rsquo;t-look-away piece of multimedia journalism...&rdquo; &mdash;David Carr, <em>The New York Times</em></p>
Published February 28, 2013
<p>It was one of the strangest sights the Coast Guard pilots had ever seen: a tall-masted wooden ship, the kind that sailed centuries ago, capsizing in the wind and towering waves of Hurricane Sandy off the coast of North Carolina. It looked like something out of a movie&mdash;and, in a way, it was. The ship was the <em>Bounty</em>, a replica of a British merchant vessel of the same name whose crew famously mutinied in 1788. She had been built for a Marlon Brando film in the 1960s&mdash;and now she was sinking, her sixteen-person crew fleeing into the sea amid the splintered wood and torn canvas.</p><p>Was the Bounty&rsquo;s sinking&mdash;which left her captain missing and one of her crew members dead&mdash;an unavoidable tragedy? Or was it the fault of a captain who was willing to risk everything to save the ship he loved? Drawing on exclusive interviews with <em>Bounty</em> survivors and Coast Guard rescuers, journalist Matthew Shaer reconstructs the ship&rsquo;s final voyage and the Coast Guard investigation into her sinking that followed, uncovering a riveting story of heroism and hubris in the eye of a hurricane.</p><p><em style="line-height: 1.8em;">The Atavist</em>&nbsp;No. 22, February 2013</p><p>45 print pages equivalent, reading time 63 minutes (estimate via Longreads.com)</p>
Published February 28, 2013
<p>It was one of the strangest sights the Coast Guard pilots had ever seen: a tall-masted wooden ship, the kind that sailed centuries ago, capsizing in the wind and towering waves of Hurricane Sandy off the coast of North Carolina. It looked like something out of a movie&mdash;and, in a way, it was. The ship was the <em>Bounty</em>, a replica of a British merchant vessel of the same name whose crew famously mutinied in 1788. She had been built for a Marlon Brando film in the 1960s&mdash;and now she was sinking, her sixteen-person crew fleeing into the sea amid the splintered wood and torn canvas.</p><p>Was the Bounty&rsquo;s sinking&mdash;which left her captain missing and one of her crew members dead&mdash;an unavoidable tragedy? Or was it the fault of a captain who was willing to risk everything to save the ship he loved? Drawing on exclusive interviews with <em>Bounty</em> survivors and Coast Guard rescuers, journalist Matthew Shaer reconstructs the ship&rsquo;s final voyage and the Coast Guard investigation into her sinking that followed, uncovering a riveting story of heroism and hubris in the eye of a hurricane.</p><p><em style="line-height: 1.8em;">The Atavist</em>&nbsp;No. 22, February 2013</p><p>45 print pages equivalent, reading time 63 minutes (estimate via Longreads.com)</p>
Published September 21, 2012
Published March 19, 2013
<p>A random email containing what purports to be news of the Lost Temple of Solomon sends day-dreaming New York-based reporter Matthew Fishbane on a journey halfway around the world&mdash;to the Solomon Islands. There, in the remote jungles of Malaita, he encounters self-described Melanesian Israelites with apocalyptic visions, dreamers guarding archaeological ruins of unknown but apparently ancient provenance, and a warlord who rallied an ethnic militia under the Star of David, as well as canny modern politicians who are leveraging the tiny island nation&rsquo;s greatest asset&mdash;sovereignty&mdash;for development assistance from the modern Jewish state. When the stray rumors that float across our laptop and iPhone screens are followed to their source, reality turns out to be even wilder and more compelling than fiction.</p><p class="p1">The full enhanced edition of <em>Solomon&rsquo;s Island </em>features&nbsp;a complete audio version read by the author,&nbsp;timelines,&nbsp;maps, and more.&nbsp;</p>